Broken open

    

One rainy day, almost two years ago, I was browsing antique shops in Mossel Bay.
I used to live there, my studio was in the Searles Manor building (a historic sandstone building, build in 1902) overlooking the harbor.
Each time I sold an artwork, I went on a “treasure hunt”, rewarding myself with exploring the many antique and pawn shops and listened to which items called out to me. I eagerly bought those items, and although I might have looked like a hoarder to many people, each and every object was carefully handpicked with much love.

Each item I bought or got at a scrapyard or on the beach, or which I found abandoned somewhere, have the potential to become an artwork.

This Oregon pine door was one of those treasures, these items might travel with me for a few months, even a few years before they “tell” me what to do with them.
This door travelled from my studio to a store where it was locked up for a few months to Klerksdorp in the Northwest, where it was patiently waiting for the ideas in my head to hatch.


Every day, I drove into the garage, I looked at it, and my subconscious mind worked with it.
All of a sudden the door grabbed my attention and with an eager enthusiasm, I started working on it.
Although I had a happy painting in mind for the door, my dark mindset, steered me in a totally different direction.


I am busy preparing for an art exhibition in April, and the theme of the exhibition will be “From broken open to breakthrough”, or that is the idea so far, it still might change but it will be something in that line.
While working on the door, I also worked through a few issues, therefore I named the door “Broken open”.

 
Only after I chose the name, I realised how appropriate the name is, because it looks like the door was physically broken open as well.


I love the phrase in Sweeping Changes by Gary Thorp:
“Do not think of doors as obstacles to whatever is on the other side. Practice opening them magnanimously and closing them with care. Through the mundane activity of entering or leaving a doorway, you can make a commitment to being either inside or outside of something larger than yourself. You can think about what you are leaving behind, about what you are entering into.

Crossing the Threshold

Working on my painting on the door

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